Tag Archives: beauty

New Release Announcement

Paige Bradley announces the release of Expansion Third Life, available in an edition of 40 – dimensions: 17 x 21 x 8 in. Unlike the larger version, the Third Life will be cracked the same way as the first one featured in NYC (see image above) with all works in this edition being the same.

“In many ways we keep coming back to where we started. Revisiting Expansion at a smaller size is proof of this. Even though the creativity and the Art I want to produce feels infinite (for this lifetime anyway), I believe that creating a smaller version of Expansion is a sign of my enduring vision of making work for everyone to enjoy. I believe that Art is for the whole of us: for our souls, for our healing, for us to feel a sense of connection through all boundaries and distances” ~ Paige Bradley


 

expansion_joshuatree(blog)Expansion voted #1 in “25 Of The Most Creative Sculptures and Statues From Around The World

The Mind Unleashed, August 2014

 


Comments on Expansion 2004- 2014

“I just have to say, I just saw your sculpture Expansion and it made me gasp and cry. I have never seen anything that striking in my entire life”. “A truly incandescent piece of art”. “I have never reacted like this to any piece of art before, though as I mentioned it, it did make me clearly remember what it was like to see the Pieta in person”. “I LOVE your work. Thank you so much!” “I often use the image of your profile picture with my psychotherapy patients to demonstrate the beauty in our brokenness. I have heard that it is in the broken places that the light shines through”. “This sculpture embodies what my spirit feels”. “Thank you for creating such a beautiful piece of art that single handedly represents my life process right now”. “Your piece Expansion is an amazing visual experience for all of us going through the ascension process”. “This sculpture has touched my soul. It represents the surgery, the meditation, my soul, the paradigm shift I have made in my life”. “You truly have an understanding of our connection with nature and our participation from the within to the without. Yours is very powerful work, reminding us of the necessary balance of the world”.


We invite you to contact a gallery in your area or email us at information@paigebradley.com for more information on this exciting new work.

www.paigebradley.com I information@paigebradley.com

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The Story of Expansion

“From the moment we are born, the world tends to have a box already built for us to fit inside.  Our umbilical cord never seems to be severed; we only find new needs to fill. If we disconnected and severed our attachments, would we shatter our confinements and expand beyond our shell? Would the world look different?  Would we recognize ourselves? Are we the box that we are inside, and to be authentically ‘un-contained’ would we still be able to exist? This is the irony of containment. As long as we don’t push on the walls of our surroundings, we may never know how strong we really are.”   PAIGE BRADLEY

expansion_london

Bronze, Electricity and Mixed Media
76” height x 35 “ width x 17” depth (with pedestal)
Artist Proof 1/1 – photographed in London, UK

I conceived of this piece when I first moved to Manhattan. I was a bit startled by the power of the curators and the critics and how they all had an anti-figure slant on what they deemed show-worthy. So many of these people felt like everything figurative had already been done, and real art was about being a “Visionary” rather than just showing ability, accuracy or general talent. Thus, the figure had generally disappeared from galleries, museums, important collections, art fairs and other shows. The few of us that were left had no place to exhibit and our voice was not being heard. Many figurative sculptors started teaching, as that was all they could do.

If I wanted to stay in the fine art field, I knew I had to join my contemporaries and make ‘contemporary’ art. I knew that it was time to let go of all the finely tuned skills I had acquired over the years, and just trust in the process of making art. The art world was telling me I had to break down my foundation, let my walls crumble, expose myself completely, and from there I will find the true essence of what I needed to say.

So, literally, I took a perfectly good (wax) sculpture– a piece I had sculpted with precision over several months– an image of a woman meditating in the lotus position, and just dropped it on the floor. I destroyed what I made. I was letting it all go. It was scary. It shattered into so many pieces. My first feeling was, “what have I done?!” Then, I trusted it would all come together like I envisioned.

Bronze, Electricity and Mixed Media 76” height x 35 “ width x 17” depth (with pedestal) Artist Proof 1/1

National Sculpture Society Exhibition, 2006

We cast all the pieces in bronze and assembled the pieces so they floated apart from one another. Then I brought in a lighting specialist and we built a crazy lighting system to make it glow from within. It turned out even better than I thought. And the best is that the image of “Expansion” means so much to so many who see it. I get letters every day! I feel like I really did my job successfully!

From the moment we are born, the world tends to have a box already built for us to fit inside.  Our umbilical cord never seems to be severed; we only find new needs to fill.

If we disconnected and severed our attachments, would we shatter our confinements and expand beyond our shell?

Would the world look different?  Would we recognize ourselves?

Are we the box that we are inside, and to be authentically ‘un-contained’ would we still be able to exist?

This is the irony of containment.  As long as we don’t push on the walls of our surroundings, we may never know how strong we really are.

Bronze, Electricity and Mixed Media 76” height x 35 “ width x 17” depth (with pedestal) Artist Proof 1/1

Expansion – photographed in New York, NY

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to GETTING EXPANSION BACK TO BROOKLYN

 

LINKS

>> Images of Expansion

>> News and Links about Expansion

>> Contact us: leo@paigebradley.com

 

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Women, the Sacred

As a young female born in the twentieth century, I have become more and more saddened by the loss of feminine power that generations have seen within the last thousand years.  I have grown up in a man’s world where women are finally coming to power so they can sit as equals with men.  Only to find out that long ago we once held that same seat; we were appreciated, empowered and even considered sacred.

The female body is a miraculous creator of life.  Even though the days of the red tents may be gone, we do not have to claim ignorance to our power to give life.  Growing up with dirty jokes, instead of wise women that share their own experiences, has taken its toll on many generations of women.

I know too many women who are shamed by their age; stretching out their wrinkles, injecting themselves with anti-age poisons, and squeezing out every bit of proof of the experiences and wisdom they have earned.

I have lost a history that I never knew.

I have lost a power that I could have had.

I have lost a family that I should have felt.

We have repressed a magic source of nature just because we could put no measure to it.  I hope we will become a society who no longer covers up who we are, but discovers who we were meant to be. We can learn to love our experiences and show them without shame.  Growing wise and understanding that beauty does not lay in an elixir, but rather tapping into the energy nature has gifted us.  It takes courage to be beautifully unique and powerfully real.

 

The Visionary, bronze by Paige Bradley

The Visionary, bronze by Paige Bradley

 

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The Artist and The Maker

I am a Maker. I fiercely respect the Maker, and I try to be one as often as I can.  It is the most fundamental of human activities– to work with our hands, creating something from nothing.  When someone asks me who I am or what I do, I call myself an Artist.  This is not better than a Maker– just a more complex form of one.  Sometimes the Maker can go missing within the Artist, and then the Artist becomes hollow.  They become political or symbolic and forget about the essence of creating.

 

As an Artist, like a Maker, I also put thought and aesthetic value into the things I make. Sometimes, when I do traditional works, there is more academic thought, compared to creating contemporary pieces, where the thought is more of a philosophical nature. Both are intense and valid.  But as an Artist, it isn’t just about making the next beautiful object.  Art must be an expression of my life experiences (either as voyeur or as participant) in this incredible journey.  And if I can express it in a way that is honest and immediate, ingenious and unusual, rare and exceptional, then I will have stepped from the Maker into the Artist’s shoes.

 

Art doesn’t have to be beautiful, ugly, shocking nor sublime, but it should be Visionary.  By ‘Visionary’ I mean a unique perspective that gives insight to the world, an emotion, or the human condition in a fresh, new way.  I realize this might not be a profound definition of ART, but it is the clearest and most concise word I have been able to come up with.

 

When dealing with aesthetics of a Work, I find myself in the role of editor frequently.  Sometimes the lack of conventional beauty is surprisingly attractive.  As an Artist I choose when and how this takes place in the work.  It has everything to do with subject-matter.  Beauty is abundant in the natural world, but too much of it– left in its raw chaotic form– and we just pass beauty by.  It doesn’t strike us as powerful because Art is not just about the object, but rather the object in comparison to its surroundings.  As an Artist, things are not as simple as making an object visually pleasing.  The environment around us is always a factor in Art’s success or failure.  Art cannot be created in a vacuum.

 

Keep environment in mind, but not the audience.  When creating Art, one must not think of the audience’s feelings because then it would be pleasing or performing instead of unravelling the truth.  It is as important for an Artist NOT to think of the audience as it is for a writer to ignore censorship. Truth is paramount and this can only be found during internal dialogue.  I have found that the more secluded and personal I am while I create, the more people relate to my Art.  I create what needs to be made. I think about what needs to be said. I make an image that needs to be freed from the confines of the mind, to be seen in a real and tangible form.  It is a reward when the audience understands and is moved by the finished piece.  And it is only then the Artist and Audience meet.

 

I imagine that as a Maker, there is a precise pattern to follow and a feeling of patience through the process.  I imagine a rhythm takes over as the Maker meticulously creates his craft.  I have none such feeling, but often yearn for it.  In contrast, as an Artist, I can say that ideas tend to burn holes inside of one’s gut until it gets out.  It is the fervor and the fever that forces our hand.  Mortality and time are our enemies, as our identities are measured by the creations of our visions.  A lifetime is not nearly long enough to realize them all.  Sometimes it causes me to shake in nervous excitement.  Other times I find myself dancing around or having philosophical conversations with my sculptures.  (Absurd, I know!)

 

We must realize we are standing on the shoulders of many before us, and this position as an Artist is one of great value and honor, and cannot be taken lightly.  We are not entertainers or designers for an audience, but instead we speak for each and every one.  We add significance, meaning and conversation that may not have taken place before.  It’s a true labor of love, but it’s not easy.  The job comes with a heavy burden and no guarantee of reward or notice.  I believe it’s not something the Artist chooses–it seems we are born into it.  When it gets to be too heavy to carry, I find the best thing to do is set it all down.  Step back into the Maker’s shoes, and find the rhythm of creating again.  That’s where the joy lies.

Paige Bradley, 1995

Paige Bradley, 1995

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