Category Archives: Art

Happy New Year

wishing everyone a
Happy 2017
from Paige Bradley


JANUARY
comes with the promise of new things. Whether it is the personal resolutions, the clean sheet of new fallen snow blanketing my front yard, or the ever-changing global political landscape, I feel as if this is the time to recalibrate and set goals.

It is also in the month of January that I age another year and I have realized that I am not only mid-career, but I am mid-life. Time is precious. A hunter can’t stand with their bow drawn forever; timing is an integral part of life. I know my children are growing up every day, just as I know time with my parents is limited.  Every year speeds forward faster. I need to capture these precious moments of love and humanity in a static work of art, that even a camera cannot capture.

As an artist, it is important that my eye stays keen but my spirit and body remain youthful.  I still have much to do, in order to capture the human spirit in Art. In order to inspire, share, and create I must remain honest but humble. Productive but precise. Tenacious but tender.

So I picture myself like the hunter; I bend the bow with all the tension of worldly pressures upon me: time, accomplishments, money, status, expectation…but I don’t let it own me. I use the pressure to crystalize the sacred moment like a diamond. I breathe it all in, keeping my heartbeat calm and steady.  I set my intention on the center of my goal and finally, I release all my faith into that moment.

I share these thoughts with you so that we can connect in our similarities. This year, may we put down our smart phones a bit more often. Perhaps we may even pick up an arrow (of sorts), picturing intentions for our best life as our target. May we find time to breathe deeply, as we experience the present moment. May we truly BE with those we love and live to our fullest capacity.

Image:  Bow, bronze, 39 inches tall (shown in clay – available 2017)

New Release Announcement

Paige Bradley announces the release of Expansion Third Life, available in an edition of 40 – dimensions: 17 x 21 x 8 in. Unlike the larger version, the Third Life will be cracked the same way as the first one featured in NYC (see image above) with all works in this edition being the same.

“In many ways we keep coming back to where we started. Revisiting Expansion at a smaller size is proof of this. Even though the creativity and the Art I want to produce feels infinite (for this lifetime anyway), I believe that creating a smaller version of Expansion is a sign of my enduring vision of making work for everyone to enjoy. I believe that Art is for the whole of us: for our souls, for our healing, for us to feel a sense of connection through all boundaries and distances” ~ Paige Bradley


 

expansion_joshuatree(blog)Expansion voted #1 in “25 Of The Most Creative Sculptures and Statues From Around The World

The Mind Unleashed, August 2014

 


Comments on Expansion 2004- 2014

“I just have to say, I just saw your sculpture Expansion and it made me gasp and cry. I have never seen anything that striking in my entire life”. “A truly incandescent piece of art”. “I have never reacted like this to any piece of art before, though as I mentioned it, it did make me clearly remember what it was like to see the Pieta in person”. “I LOVE your work. Thank you so much!” “I often use the image of your profile picture with my psychotherapy patients to demonstrate the beauty in our brokenness. I have heard that it is in the broken places that the light shines through”. “This sculpture embodies what my spirit feels”. “Thank you for creating such a beautiful piece of art that single handedly represents my life process right now”. “Your piece Expansion is an amazing visual experience for all of us going through the ascension process”. “This sculpture has touched my soul. It represents the surgery, the meditation, my soul, the paradigm shift I have made in my life”. “You truly have an understanding of our connection with nature and our participation from the within to the without. Yours is very powerful work, reminding us of the necessary balance of the world”.


We invite you to contact a gallery in your area or email us at information@paigebradley.com for more information on this exciting new work.

www.paigebradley.com I information@paigebradley.com

Looking Ahead

I am so appreciative of those that love the Expansion piece.

 

Expansion, Bronze and Electricity by Paige Bradley

Expansion, Bronze and Electricity by Paige Bradley

…. And I am just getting started.  So many more sculptures like this to do.  Any kind of support I get makes this all happen faster.

When someone purchases a sculpture of mine, it does not fund fancy clothes, cars, or trips, but instead gives me the ability to create more sculptures.  I want to make sure my ideas don’t die when I die– stuck inside my head.  I want to make sure my inspirations see the light, for they might inspire others to create wonderful things that this planet needs so badly.

I am grateful for all who write poems, songs, notes, and admire Expansion in their own way.  This appreciation is a wonderful currency of its own and it makes me feel successful and connected to the universe.

Additionally, it costs quite a bit of money to break bonds and tread into places yet untraveled.  It is so exciting (and emotionally needed), that I am willing to spend every dime I can to do it.  But any funding toward Expansion (or the likes thereof) will go towards spreading more light-filled inspirational sculptures around the world.  These will be tangible works of Art that people can approach, touch, and let the light fill their hearts.  Not “Art” that must demand a ticket behind a curator’s impenetrable, architecturally refined, door.  Not the “Art” for showing up the neighbor’s collection and impressing the interior designers.   I truly hope that this can be seen as pure and simple Art; Images to feed the Soul and heal our fragile connections.

In this time, it is financial support that is the fuel of progress.   And I have so many healing and uplifting ideas in my heart and mind that I yearn to see the light of day.  I am so afraid our world is becoming dark.  Celebrating my 41st birthday this month is also a reminder that I am already through half my life and I have no time to waste.  I can no longer worry about being “timely” or “politically correct” or “classy”.  I am here now, and I am willing and able to give all I can.  I might not be able to say that in a few more decades.

Creating images to help others feel more understood and connected is not a job for an apathetic heart.  And one person cannot create great works of art in a vacuum.  It takes the support of many. I pay homage to everyone who has ever written me a note of thanks, reposted an image, purchased a sculpture, pinned up a print on the wall, or told someone else about the work.  All of this adds to more energy for me to create more.  And I honor the trust.  And I will create with honesty and truth.  I will not let you down.

If you would like to get in touch, please email leo@paigebradley.com

Thank you.

Paige

IMAGES OF EXPANSION

#GETTING EXPANSION BACK TO BROOKLYN

Expansion, Bronze and Electricity by Paige Bradley.

Expansion – photographed in New York, NY
Empire Fulton-Ferry State Park/ Brooklyn Bridge Park in DUMBO, Brooklyn

 

 

Expansion and the City of London Bronze, Electricity and Mixed Media 76” height x 35 “ width x 17” depth (with pedestal) Artist Proof 1/1 - photographed in London, UK

Expansion and the City of London
Bronze, Electricity and Mixed Media
76” height x 35 “ width x 17” depth (with pedestal)
Artist Proof 1/1 – photographed in London, UK

 

 

Expansion in a Collector's Garden Joshua Tree, California

Expansion in a Collector’s Garden
Joshua Tree, California

Expansion, Bronze and Electricity by Paige Bradley

Expansion, Bronze and Electricity by Paige Bradley

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Expansion at the Henley Festival, July 2014 Henley-On-Thames, UK

Expansion at the Henley Festival,
July 2014
Henley-On-Thames, UK

expansion_blog3.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Return to GETTING EXPANSION BACK TO BROOKLYN

FRAUD – WARNING to Artists and Galleries!

Dear All,

I caught a fraud attempt on my work in extremis and would like to share details with you so that you can be more aware of suspicious requests should they come to you.

I have recently received an email from a so-called Frank Saylor ( email address: franksaylor01@gmail.com )  inquiring about one of my paintings to offer to his wife.

The “client” said he was moving to the Philippines and needed the painting to be picked up by a shipper ASAP.  He then “fed-exed” me a questionable check and asked me to pay the shipper directly via wire transfer. At this point I became highly suspicious and started some research on the internet.

I found a gallery had been victim of the same fraud attempt on them, and thank God they wrote about it on the net: http://www.siliconinvestor.com/readmsg.aspx?msgid=29394404

A couple of days later I received a similarly suspicious email from a so-called Larry Douglas larrydouglas9090@gmail.com

I hope you will not have to deal with such requests, and if you do, I hope my note will have been a little helpful.

Here are links on how to report a fraud:

http://www.actionfraud.police.uk/report-a-fraud/how-to-report-a-fraud

http://www.stopfraud.gov/report.html

All my best,

Paige

The Artist and The Maker

I am a Maker. I fiercely respect the Maker, and I try to be one as often as I can.  It is the most fundamental of human activities– to work with our hands, creating something from nothing.  When someone asks me who I am or what I do, I call myself an Artist.  This is not better than a Maker– just a more complex form of one.  Sometimes the Maker can go missing within the Artist, and then the Artist becomes hollow.  They become political or symbolic and forget about the essence of creating.

 

As an Artist, like a Maker, I also put thought and aesthetic value into the things I make. Sometimes, when I do traditional works, there is more academic thought, compared to creating contemporary pieces, where the thought is more of a philosophical nature. Both are intense and valid.  But as an Artist, it isn’t just about making the next beautiful object.  Art must be an expression of my life experiences (either as voyeur or as participant) in this incredible journey.  And if I can express it in a way that is honest and immediate, ingenious and unusual, rare and exceptional, then I will have stepped from the Maker into the Artist’s shoes.

 

Art doesn’t have to be beautiful, ugly, shocking nor sublime, but it should be Visionary.  By ‘Visionary’ I mean a unique perspective that gives insight to the world, an emotion, or the human condition in a fresh, new way.  I realize this might not be a profound definition of ART, but it is the clearest and most concise word I have been able to come up with.

 

When dealing with aesthetics of a Work, I find myself in the role of editor frequently.  Sometimes the lack of conventional beauty is surprisingly attractive.  As an Artist I choose when and how this takes place in the work.  It has everything to do with subject-matter.  Beauty is abundant in the natural world, but too much of it– left in its raw chaotic form– and we just pass beauty by.  It doesn’t strike us as powerful because Art is not just about the object, but rather the object in comparison to its surroundings.  As an Artist, things are not as simple as making an object visually pleasing.  The environment around us is always a factor in Art’s success or failure.  Art cannot be created in a vacuum.

 

Keep environment in mind, but not the audience.  When creating Art, one must not think of the audience’s feelings because then it would be pleasing or performing instead of unravelling the truth.  It is as important for an Artist NOT to think of the audience as it is for a writer to ignore censorship. Truth is paramount and this can only be found during internal dialogue.  I have found that the more secluded and personal I am while I create, the more people relate to my Art.  I create what needs to be made. I think about what needs to be said. I make an image that needs to be freed from the confines of the mind, to be seen in a real and tangible form.  It is a reward when the audience understands and is moved by the finished piece.  And it is only then the Artist and Audience meet.

 

I imagine that as a Maker, there is a precise pattern to follow and a feeling of patience through the process.  I imagine a rhythm takes over as the Maker meticulously creates his craft.  I have none such feeling, but often yearn for it.  In contrast, as an Artist, I can say that ideas tend to burn holes inside of one’s gut until it gets out.  It is the fervor and the fever that forces our hand.  Mortality and time are our enemies, as our identities are measured by the creations of our visions.  A lifetime is not nearly long enough to realize them all.  Sometimes it causes me to shake in nervous excitement.  Other times I find myself dancing around or having philosophical conversations with my sculptures.  (Absurd, I know!)

 

We must realize we are standing on the shoulders of many before us, and this position as an Artist is one of great value and honor, and cannot be taken lightly.  We are not entertainers or designers for an audience, but instead we speak for each and every one.  We add significance, meaning and conversation that may not have taken place before.  It’s a true labor of love, but it’s not easy.  The job comes with a heavy burden and no guarantee of reward or notice.  I believe it’s not something the Artist chooses–it seems we are born into it.  When it gets to be too heavy to carry, I find the best thing to do is set it all down.  Step back into the Maker’s shoes, and find the rhythm of creating again.  That’s where the joy lies.

Paige Bradley, 1995

Paige Bradley, 1995

Art is a universal language.

When I first inquired about an ad I’d seen at The Juilliard School, ‘looking for dancers to model for a sculptor’, my only intention was to put some extra cash in my pocket. I was truly unaware of the artistic journey I would be taking in the field of visual art with Paige Bradley. As a dancer and actor, to explore this whole other world of artistry and to be a key part in helping Paige produce stunning sculptures, has been nothing short of feeling creatively fulfilled. My dear friend Paige and I come from very different artistic backgrounds but working with her has made me realize that art itself, is a universal language.

Michael Walters

Michael Walters

Michael Walters

 

Michael Walters in Harmony, bronze by Paige Bradley.

Michael Walters in Harmony, bronze by Paige Bradley.

 

Michael Walters in Ballet International, Bronze by Paige Bradley

Michael Walters in Ballet International, Bronze by Paige Bradley

 

 

 

Michael Walters in Dreamer, Bronze by Paige Bradley

Michael Walters in Dreamer, Bronze by Paige Bradley

 

 

Art is YOU and I

“Art is not luxury, it is you and I”… I agree, when one collects bronze sculptures, it IS a luxury.

But there is no price tag on viewing or appreciating work.  Many of my ‘appreciators’ do not have the money to buy art and I send them posters instead.  They are happy to live with the Art this way.  I consider them just as powerful ‘art connoisseurs’ as the ones who can afford to buy bronze.  It’s because the work speaks to them somehow.  It tells a story that they understand. Their soul empathizes with the message the sculpture brings.  It is their love of the art that makes the art powerful and real.

That is why I say Art is ‘YOU and I’… Because Art can never really be completely created in a vacuum.  I DO create Art for me, but successful Art is understood and appreciated by others too.  The deeper and more meaningful it is to the populous, the more powerful the Art becomes.  If the public never sees it or understands the work, if they feel nothing toward it, they don’t make the work part of their lives.  Then how can it be Art?  Art is supposed to be powerful and significant.  If it’s only for me, I might as well just be making crafts.

So we do this together and we make great Art.  I invite models to apply because I want to help tell your story.

 

Paige Bradley & Michael Walters (model) working on Dreamer, 2007

Paige Bradley & Michael Walters (model) working on Dreamer, 2007

The Oddest Media

MEDIA as a discussion

As artists, we are clearly pushing the boundaries of materials more and more.  We are literally brushed aside and stepped over by curators, critics, and contemporary collectors if our chosen material is one of traditional nature.  Long forgotten are the days of grinding pigments for our oil paints, adding retardant to our plaster, creating our own alloys for the perfect bronze casting.   Even art supply stores can only stock the materials that are foundational, but you will not find material for the visionary artist.  So, where will we find the media that will allow our work to finally jump from traditional to contemporary? Take to the garbage dumps, Ebay, the refrigerator….

What is the oddest media you have ever seen in Fine Art? blood (‘Blood portrait’, Marc Quinn) , urine (‘Piss Christ’, Serrano) or – my personal fave: shadows.  Can one claim a natural happenstance upon the work as Media, such as dust, weeds, a tossed out cigarette butt ?  And the most important question… Does material make the work contemporary, or is it subject matter?  Must they be linked equally, or is one more important than another?

 

SloshingPlaster

Sloshing plaster

 

Form and Space

One of the things that have always bothered me about Sculpture is the Space that I fill up by creating it. That may seem funny, but please understand that for a sculptor, Space is our ultimate muse. Crowding, darkening, weighing down Space around us is absolute torture to the creative soul.

When a sculptor makes a piece, it is not only the sculpture that we create (the positive form) but we also somehow form the Space around the sculpture. Of course Space has been here for millennia, since the beginning of time, and a sculptor doesn’t really create Space. Space is divine, eternal, maybe even God. But we enjoy playing with Her infinity by carving and forming a physical object inside of Her vastness. The (negative) Space around an object must be a carefully thought out, just as the object itself.

This is true with anything really. It the Yin and Yang, the ebb and flow, the dark and the light. Without one, the other diminishes altogether. Since a sculptor is one who creates form and volume from empty Space–a void–it makes sense that we are slave to Her, yet we give great homage to Space because without Her, we are nothing.

Not onlForm and Space IMG_0843y do I create forms that fill up Space, but I also create heavy ones. Bronze by nature is a heavy and permanent material, lasting thousands of years, but unmoving, unchanging, and even sometimes burdensome and dark. Ironically, the moment bronze is cast it is dynamic and powerful. Standing next to a bronze pour feels like flying next to the Sun. It takes many people and many machines to harness the power of liquid bronze. Bronze is one of the most dynamic materials to be created by human civilization. It is not something to be taken lightly… no pun intended!

 

 

I want to make my finished bronzes as dynamic as they are in its liquid state. I don’t want to just fill up space with something heavy and burdensome. When I create a piece, I want to make sure that the Space around my sculpture welcomes it and that they compliment each other. I want my sculptures to float up and soar off the pedestal. The viewer will have an undying need to touch and walk around my sculptures. Form and Space will create music where they touch. Surrounded with the gentle embrace of Space, the sculpture will be home at last.
Empty Space is simply refreshing and enjoyable, but Space with a sculpture can become beautiful and powerful. Space will become joyous if a physical form graces her just right. With ultimate consideration of our limited Space on this Earth, I mindfully create sculptures that love the Space and Space loves the sculpture right back.

What Art offers is Space – a certain breathing room for the spirit” – John Updike

Bronze pour

Bronze pour

Form and sPACE IMG_0886